Tag Archives: buying a home

Prepare For The Unforeseen Expenses Of Homeownership

Unforeseen Expenses Of Homeownership

Being a homeowner has been your dream since you were a kid and you finally accomplished it.

Then, moving day comes. Once all the boxes are unloaded, and the furniture is shoved roughly into the right rooms, you grab a coffee and take a breather. And that is when it dawns on you. This is only just the beginning.

As a new homeowner, there are whole lists of things you need to take care of, and almost all of them cost money.

So, if you are planning to buy a new home, have just signed the paperwork, or are moving in next week, this list is for you. And if you know someone who is moving in, be a friend and give them a heads-up as well.

Property Tax – Up to $10,000: When it comes to property tax, a lot of people get sticker shock a year after they move into a new construction. The reason for this is simple; the taxes are based on the empty lot the home was built on says, Local Records Office. But a year later, the assessors come around and put a new valuation on the lot, which now has a beautiful home sitting on it. You can also face much higher taxes based on the particular school district you live in. And of course, taxes vary greatly by state. The average property taxes paid in New Jersey are almost $7,500, as opposed to $1,500 in Colorado, as of 2017.

Major Appliances – Up to $10,000: New home builds usually include a dishwasher, microwave, and stove, with the option of a fridge/freezer, washer, and dryer. They are basic unless you opt for the upgrades in your contract, but if you do, they could add a chunk to your monthly mortgage payment. If you buy a used home, you may not have any appliances included.

HOA Fees – Up to $700 a Month: Many new homes come with a Home Owners Association, and most used homes have HOAs as well. In theory, they’re a sound idea. They are there to keep the neighborhood looking great, and deal with trash collection, playgrounds, community pools, street lighting, common areas, snow removal, and so on. A typical HOA can run $100 a month. Some are just a few hundred a year, while in the higher-end neighborhoods, you may not see much change out of $1,000 every month.

Insurance – Up to $2,000 Annually: There are a few different types of insurance you need to have when buying a home. First, you must have homeowner’s insurance. The average cost of this is around $700 annually, but this varies by state. You should also have contents insurance, based on the value of your possessions. You could, of course, skip this payment. But if tragedy does strike, you could lose everything.

Utilities – Up to $400 Monthly: Again, if you live in a mansion that figure will be greater. And in a new one-bedroom apartment, much less. But on average, when moving into a new home, you will see utility bills in the hundreds of dollars. This can be quite a shock, especially if you were formerly in a small apartment or even living with your parents.

Repairs and Maintenance – Unknown: One of the biggest unknown expenses of owning a home is the repairs and maintenance costs that can hit you out of nowhere. If you were formerly renting, that was all taken care of. Now it is all on you. If the hot water heater goes out, you pay. If the roof leaks, you pay. If strong winds blow your fence down, you pay.
Yes, being a homeowner is the American dream, but it does not always come cheap. There are a lot of hidden fees and expenses. If you make a plan to cover these expenditures, then you will be a well-prepared homeowner.  ***

Rent-to-Own Isn’t as Easy as You May Think

_tma_Rent-to-own

Today I ran across a fact about current housing market that made me stop in my tracks. Homeownership is at its lowest in 25 years. Wait, excuse me? You must have your facts wrong, sir. We can’t seem to slow down this incredible surge in today’s market! Unfortunately, I was mistaken. And the reason behind it is not what you think.

According to the U.S. Census, the rate of homeownership fell to 63.7%, a rate that hasn’t been matched since 1990. But if housing demand is rising and pricing is rising, why isn’t homeownership? The upswing in the economy is actually having a reverse effect on the housing market. Hold on. Let me explain…

Because there is a rise in the economy, there are more millennials moving out of their parents’ homes and into a rental property. This increases the demand of rental properties. In fact, rental vacancies are at an all-time low. The more demand there is for these soon-to-be rental properties, the price for said properties begins to rise, which is what we can see from the latest market reports. Unfortunately, the rise in pricing for these rental properties doesn’t allow first-time buyers to buy. Instead, these single-family homes are bought by investors and rented.

And therein lies the homeownership hit. It really comes down to inventory and these days there isn’t enough of it. And sadly, this leaves a lot of lower and middle-class families unable to join the ranks of homeowners. The more prices rise and expectations are met and/or exceeded, the more homeownership will drop. David Blitzer of S&P Dow Jones Indices states, “Home prices continue to rise and outpace both inflation and wage gains. If a complete recovery means new highs all around, we aren’t there yet.”

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